Tag Archives: 2111

E1761 – M1014, Joint Service Combat Shotgun

The M1014, Joint Service Combat Shotgun was adopted in November, 2001 by the United States Marine Corps to replace three different service shotguns currently in use by the Corps.
Manufacturer: Benelli U.S.A. Corporation.
Caliber: 12 gauge, accepts 23/4" and 3" standard and magnum loads.Length: 39.8" w/stock extended, 34.9" collapsed.
Weight: 8.44 lbs. empty.
Safety: Ambidextrous manual cross bolt.
Magazine Capacity: Six 3" shells seven 23/4", plus one chambered round can be unloaded without cycling through the action.
Trigger Pull: 5.5 to 7.28 lbs.
Buttstock: Modular telescopic with removable pistol grip.
Sights: Adjustable aperture rear and fixed post front, radius 23.7"
Maximum Effective Range: 40 yards with 00 buckshot and in excess of 100 yards with the rifled slug.

E1760 SHOTGUN, 12 GAUGE, WINCHESTER

The Winchester Model 1200 is a manually operated, repeating shotgun with a slide action. It has a five round capacity, one in the chamber and four in its tubular magazine. There is a slide safety forward of the trigger housing. The basic weight of the gun is 6.5 pounds but the addition of the sling and bayonet with its attachment band brings the weight to 8.5 pounds.

Bore 12 gauge (0.729 inch)
Barrel smooth bored
Action Manual slide (pump gun)
Firing mechanism Hammerless
Magazine Tubular, 4 round capacity
Cooling Air
Length of barrel 20 in.
Length of stock & receiver 20 in.
Length of assembled gun 40 in.
Weight of assembled gun 6.5 pounds
Weight with all attachments 8.5 pounds
Weight of M1917 bayonet 1 lb. 2 oz.

E1760 – Remington Model 870 Shotgun

The Remington Model 870 Shotgun is a manually operated, tubular magazine-fed, pump-action shoulder weapon suitable for close quarters combat, MOUT breaching, guard duty, and many other operational roles.

Type: pump-action combat shotgun

Calibre: 12 gauge 70mm.

Weight: 3.6kg

Dimensions: length 1060mm; barrel length 533mm

Ammunition Types: Buckshot, birdshot, solid slug, flechette, CS gas canister, plastic baton and many others

Effective Range: 50m (shot), 400m (flechette, in open country)

Rate Of Fire: Single shot manual pump action

Magazine Capacity: 7 round tubular

E1442 – M16A4

M16A4 Rifle, now in production, features a performance identical to the M16A2. Physical differences between the two weapons include a removable carrying handle with an integral rail-mounting system on the M16A4. When the carrying handle is removed, any accessory device with a rail grabber, such as an optical sight, can be mounted on the weapon.  The M16A4 replaced the M16A2.The M16A4, now standard issue for front-line U.S. Marine Corps and some U.S. Army units, replaces the combination fixed carry handle/rear iron sight with a MIL-STD-1913 Picatinny rail, allowing for the rifle to be equipped with a carry handle and/or most military and consumer scopes or sighting systems.[8] Most of the U.S. Marine Corps' M16A4s are equipped with a Knight's Armament Company M5 RAS handguard, allowing vertical grips, lasers, tactical lights, and other accessories to be attached. U.S. Army M16A4s also often feature the KAC M5 RAS. In U.S. Army Field Manuals, M16A4s fitted with the RAS are sometimes referred to as M16A4 MWS or Modular Weapon System. This model retains the 3-round burst mode of the M16A2.
Caliber:      5.56x45 mm NATO
Magazine capacity:     30 rounds
Weight without magazine:     7.5 lbs.
Overall length:     39.6 in.
Barrel Length:     20 in.
Method of operation:     gas
Muzzle velocity (M855/SS109):     3,100 ft/sec
Maximum range (M855/SS109):     3,600 meters

E1441 – M16A2

The development of the M16A2 rifle was originally requested by the United States Marine Corps as a result of the USMC's combat experiences in Vietnam with the M16 and M16A1. The Marines were the first branch of the US Armed Forces to adopt the M16A2 in the early/mid 1980s with the United States Army following suit in adopting the M16A2 in the late 1980s.

Weight     8.5 lb (3.9 kg)
Length     39.5 in (1,003 mm)
Barrel length     20 in (508 mm)
Cartridge     5.56x45mm NATO
Action     Gas-operated, rotating bolt
Rate of fire     800-900 rounds/min, cyclic depending on model
Muzzle velocity     3,200 ft/s (975 m/s) (M16A1)     3,050 ft/s (930 m/s) (M16A2)
Effective range     550 m (600 yd)

 

The M-16A2 has been replaced my the M-16A4.

E1250 – M9

The M9 Beretta pistol is the standard Marine Corps sidearm. It "replaced" the M1911A1 pistol in .45 caliber for Officers and SNCOs.  The M9 is a light weight, semiautomatic pistol manufactured by Beretta with has redundant automatic safety features to help prevent unintentional discharges. It can be fired in either double or single action mode and can be unloaded without activating the trigger while the safety is in the "on" position. The M9 pistol has a 15-round magazine, and may be fired without a magazine inserted. This weapon can have the hammer lowered from the cocked, "ready to fire," position to the un-cocked position without activating the trigger by placing the thumb safety on the "on" position.  Primary function: Semiautomatic pistol.
Builder: Beretta and Beretta USA
Length: 8.54 inches (21.69 centimeters)
Width: 1.50 inches (3.81 centimeters)
Height: 5.51 inches (14 centimeters)
Barrel length: 4.92 inches (12.5 centimeters)
Weight fully loaded: 2.55 pounds (1.16 kilograms)
Bore diameter: 9mm (approximately .355 inches)
Maximum effective range: 152.5 feet (50 meters)
Magazine capacity: 15 rounds
Muzzle velocity: 1200 feet (365 meters) per second

E1126 – M3 Tripod

The M3 tripod is on of many mounting systems used for the M2 .50 cal. The M3 is strictly used when the weapon is ground mounted. The M3 consists of three adjustable legs which support the weight of the weapon as well as transfer the energy of the recoil from the weapon to the ground. The M2 causes incredible forces on the tripod and can actually move the entire weapon system. To keep the the weapon from moving the tripod must be dug into place. Each leg is dug in separately so the recoil does not push the tripod backwards and then each leg of the tripod must be weighted down(usually with sand bags) so to keep the tripod from moving during firing. Even after the weapon has been dug in some settling may occur during the first shots of the weapon.

E1095 – M252 81mm Mortar System

The M252 81mm Mortar System was developed under a co-developement agreement with the United Kingdom to replace the M29A1 Mortar. A Blast Attenuation Device (BAD) is attached to the muzzle of the cannon assembly to reduce the blast effects on the mortar crew. The M252 is ideally suited to support airborne, air assault, mountain and light infantry units.
Length: 56 inches (142.24 centimeters)
Bore diameter: 81mm
Elevation: 45 to 85 degrees
Weight:

  • Mortar Assembly: 35 pounds (15.89 kg)
  • Bipod: 26 pounds (11.80 kilograms)
  • Baseplate: 25.5 pounds (11.58 kilograms)
  • Sight Unit: 2.5 pounds (1.14 kilograms)
  • Total: 89 pounds (40.41 kilograms)

Maximum effective range: 5700 meters
Minimum Range: 80 meters

Rates of fire:

  • Maximum: 33 rounds per minute
  • Sustained: 16 rounds per minute

Unit Replacement Cost: $24,717

Type Classified Standard: July 1984
The M252 Mortar System consists of the following major components:

  • M253 Cannon Assembly (35 lbs)
  • M177 Bipod Assembly (27 lbs)
  • M3A1 Baseplate (25.5 lbs)

Features: The M252 81mm Medium Extended Range Mortar is a crew-served, medium weight mortar which is highly accurate and provides for a greater range (4,500 meters to 5,650 meters) and lethality than the previous 81mm mortar. The cannon has a crew-removable breech plug and firing pin. The muzzle end has a short tapered lead-in which acts as a blast attenuator device. The breech end is finned for better cooling. This mortar also uses the standard M64 mortar sight of the 60mm mortar, M224.

Background: This mortar replaced the previous Marine Corps 81mm mortar in 1986. The M252 is an adaptation of the standard British 81mm mortar developed in the 1970s. It is mostly commonly found in the mortar platoon of an infantry battalion.

E1065 – M224 Mortar System

The M224 60mm LWCMS is ideally suited to support airborne, air assault, mountain, ranger, Special Operations Forces and light infantry units. The M224 can be drop fired (conventional mode) or trigger fired (conventional or hand-held mode). A lightweight auxiliary baseplate is used when firing the mortar in the hand-held mode.
Length: 40 inches (101.6 centimeters)
Weight: 46.5 pounds (21.11 kilograms)
Bore diameter: 60mm
Maximum effective range: 2.17 miles (3490 meters)
Rates of fire:

  • Maximum: 30 rounds/minute
  • Sustained: 20 rounds/minute

Unit Replacement Cost: $10,658

The M224 Mortar System consists of the following major components:

  • M225 Cannon Assembly (14.4 lbs)
  • M170 Bipod Assembly (15.2 lbs)
  • M7 Baseplate (14.4 lbs)
  • M8 Auxiliary Baseplate (3.6 lbs)

Mission: To provide the company commander with an indirect-fire weapon.

Features: The M224 60mm Lightweight Mortar is a smooth bore, muzzle loading, high-angle-of-fire weapon. The cannon assembly is composed of the barrel, combination base cap, and firing mechanism. The mount consists of a bipod and a base plate which is provided with screw type elevating and traversing mechanisms to elevate/traverse the mortar. The M64 sight unit is attached to the bipod mount via a standard dovetail. An additional short range sight is attached to the base of the cannon tube for firing the mortar on the move and during assaults. It has a spring-type shock absorber to absorb the shock of recoil in firing.

Background: The M224 replaced the older (WWII era) M2 and M19, 60mm Mortars. These weapons only possessed 2,200 yards of effective range. The M224 was designed to fire all types of the older ammunition, but its primary rounds are of the newer, longer-range type.